Fine Art

Pricing available upon request.

Ralph Ventura

Artist’s Statement

It is said that most of us will never write a great novel, but all of us will live one. It is for this reason that I photograph, to capture the ever-changing and infinitely unique pages of the novel of my life. The people and places in my photos are characters in my novel as I am in theirs. We exist through these novels. I photograph this existence and bear witness to life.

Artist Andres Pruna (Andy Pruna), born in 1940, is a Cuban painter who was educated in Havana’s San Alejandro Academy of Fine Arts, Massachusetts’s Eaglebrook School, and New York City’s National Academy Museum and School of Fine Arts.

But, it has been his vast work and experience as an Officer in the US Navy Underwater Demolitions/Seals team in the Bay of Pigs (UDT), contractphotographer for National Geographic, deep-sea diver and Aquanaut for the Navy, and award-winning wildlife documentary filmmaker, that has shaped his unique creative vision.

When not traveling, Andy, the modern-day renaissance man with a mind for conservation, lives and paints in Miami, FL, where he is also husband to wife, María Isabel, and father to three talented offspring.

The Children and Wildlife Series 

All my life I’ve been a lover of animals. For more than 50 years, I have devoted agreat deal of my time to filming, photographing, rearing and studying a variety of animals all over the world.

For a long time, I’ve been alarmed with the ever-increasing threats to our wildlife. Be it through climate change, diminishing habitats, increasing human population, pollution, indiscriminate poaching, hunting, and just plain ignorance, it is nowreported by the World Wildlife Fund that Earth has already lost half of its wildlife in the last 40 years. According to thousands of scientists worldwide, in that time we have been experiencing a sixth extinction; an unprecedented extinction rate that is accelerating and will result in a mass extinction of all living organisms within the next 60 or so years. This means that young children alive today will live to see a world with far less wildlife left on our planet. It’s hard for me to imagine a world without birds singing in the fields or butterflies or tigers and elephants or coral reefs or lush jungles.

My paintings of young boys and girls from different nationalities together with all sorts of animals is to show how natural this looks for those of us that are alive today. It’s also a way of showing a communion which we now take for granted, but may soon no longer exist: the kinship between the humanity and our co- inhabitants. It is my way of subtly raising some awareness to a problem that may no longer be imaginary.